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Metal/Prog Metal CD Reviews

Robin Beck

Do You Miss Me

Review by Greg Olma

It has to be hard to not be yourself in this crazy music business. You constantly have to re-invent yourself to keep the music buying public interested. Even big stars like Madonna have to keep changing to make a splash in the record charts. It is refreshing when you see an artist just be themselves. Robin Beck has stayed true to form. She was never a mega star but she did have a bit of a following. Instead of trying to re-invent herself, or even worse, jumping onto a trend, she has decided to create an album that is an honest representation of where she is at. Sure, the CD sounds like it could have come out in the ‘80s but if that is who she is, then so be it. Music shouldn’t have a “sell by” date. Robin’s voice has held up well and why shouldn’t she make a record that she feels is honest.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2006 Volume 5 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Do You Miss Me
This ‘80s sounding track kicks off the CD in fine form. It is very pop oriented and reminds me of that other female fronted ‘80s band Scandal.
Walk on the Moon
It is hard not to make comparisons but this cut could have been on a Heart record. That is not a bad thing. There are worse bands to be compared to. It also contains a very catchy chorus.
Your Love Is Tough
The Heart sound continues but the vocals are given an extra push. This has “hit single” written all over it. It’s a shame that this did not come out 15 years ago. This would have been all over the radio.
The Safest Place (I Wanna Be Strong)
Beck continues to shine with this track. She sings and phrases the lyrics like a young Bonnie Tyler. This is the best cut on the record.
What About Us
This tune is a bit faster in tempo, which by this point in the CD is a nice change. It could have been a great opening track and also contains a very Pat Benatar-ish sound to it.
I Wanna Hear It From You
Keeping with the ‘80s sound, this is the power ballad. There is a great guitar solo in there but other than that, it is rather ordinary.
Stone by Stone
This is another ordinary track that sounds like a throw away from a Rik Emmett album. Since both tracks are not that good, they should have been spaced out on the CD making sure to keep the listener interested.
Find a Little Faith
Beck finally comes back with a good cut that has bit of power ballad in it. It does contain more of a modern sound and although power ballad and modern don’t necessarily go together, here it somehow works.
Coming Back For More
I could swear this was a Scandal tune. It is very ‘80s sounding but it is really good. Robin Beck puts in a great vocal performance on this cut.
I Don't Wanna Play This Game Anymore
This track is a bit more modern sounding also but unlike “Find A Little Faith,” this piece does not have that little spark to raise it from average.
Takin' A Ride
The intro reminds me a bit of REM but then it turns into a Rik Emmett (solo material) track. This is the second best cut on the album and I am surprised that it is so late in the track listing. Usually artists want to keep the best songs at the beginning. Let this be a lesson to all of us; play the CD all the way through, You might be surprised to find a nice little gem towards the end.
Bring It Back
If this track was played a bit more country, it would have been a huge hit on the country music charts. It is unfair because if Shania Twain sang it, it would have been a hit. Beck’s voice is just as good but she does not have the “machine” behind her like Shania. This cut ends the album in fine fashion.
 
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