Artists | Issues | CD Reviews | Interviews | Concert Reviews | DVD/Video Reviews | Book Reviews | Who We Are | Staff | Home
 
Progressive Rock CD Reviews

Farflung

A Wound in Eternity

Review by Gary Hill

I should start with a few words about the inclusion of this review in the progressive rock section. Most people consider space rock to be a sub-genre within progressive rock. Well, this disc is certainly space rock – although it’s also quite metallic. In fact, I could see the argument being made that this is a metal CD quite easily. But, first and foremost, it’s space rock – and therefore fits into the progressive rock category. With the exception of the last couple tracks this CD is a lot like Hawkwind. There are also elements of Pink Floyd here, and some other bands, but there is no question that these guys like Hawkwind. This is a pounding, hard-edged space rock extravaganza and one hell of an album.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2008  Volume 3 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Unborn Planet
Swirling, chirping, Hawkwind like keys lead this off. Keys hold the track for a while and then they launch out into a hard rocking jam that’s probably three quarters Hawkwind and one quarter some unnamed more accessible heavy rock band.

Endless Drifting Wreck
This has a slightly punky feel to it, but overall is another pounding, Hawkwind-like rocker. There is a cool drop back to more ambient zones for a time. This section provides us with some pretty keyboard textures.
Like It Has Never Been
This certainly still has some Hawkwind tendencies, but I hear more standard psychedelia here and some definite early Pink Floyd. This is a change of pace, running a bit slower and mellower than the previous tracks. They do shift out to more powerhouse jamming later that’s more like the two disc openers.
Stella Volo
You could see this one as Hawkwind meets some ‘80’s new wave band, but they simply shred with the metallic modes at points here. It shifts out into a world music inspired section later in the track and this one segues straight into the next one.
IX
While the overall motif in the early sections is pretty keyboard type sounds a driving rock beat pulls the track along. Somehow the vocals remind me of Rammstein. This powers up a bit later, but retains its slower grind in terms of tempo. This becomes downright metallic before it ends.
Silver Shrooms
Spacey ambient tones (with chirps that call to mind Pink Floyd’s “Echoes”) make up the first minute of this. They bring in some more “rock” oriented sounds after a time, but it still says reasonably sedate. The vocals are laid over the top of this slow moving backdrop. Around the three minute mark they crank it up into a harder edged jam. Some killer guitar work soars over the backdrop as the vocals also rise to the stars. They crescendo and drop it way down, but then scream back out in metallic glory.

Invincible
This one comes in feeling rather techno, with a stripped down arrangement backing up the vocals. A funky sort of bass line enters and they gradually work this through, building on it as they go. This turns into the most metallic jam of the whole CD here. This is also a track that has few Hawkwind leanings. In fact, I’d say that this harder edged segment is closer to Powerman 5000 than Hawkwind. A mellower grind enters to take the song to its conclusion.
Precognition
The first minute and a half or so of this is nothing but chirping space sounds. They power out from there into another powerhouse jam. This is another that’s fairly free of Hawkwind textures as even that intro is closer to Pink Floyd. This is a pure screamer and without question my favorite track on the CD.
You'll find extra content from this artist in the Music Street Journal members area.
 
More CD Reviews
Metal/Prog Metal
Non-Prog
Progressive Rock
 
Google

   Creative Commons License
   This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.

    © 2019 Music Street Journal                                                                           Site design and programming by Studio Fyra, Inc./Beetcafe.com