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Progressive Rock CD Reviews

Nightingale

Daylight Saving Time

Review by Josh Turner

If you did a search for bands with the name Nightingale, you would wind up with more than a single hit. In the world of progressive music, the one fronted by the Swedish singer and guitarist Dan Swano would typically be the first that comes to mind. There is another band by the name Nightingale that qualifies itself for the genre. While Dan Swano's Nightingale is more along the lines of Progressive Metal, this one is based around an Italian quartet that is a cross between California Guitar Trio, Mastermind, and Sonus Umbra.

Piero Delucia does double-duty as the vocalist and guitarist. Francesco d'Ercole provides the keyboards. The brothers Paola and Nicola Ruggieri play the drums and bass respectively.

The lyrics read more like poetry than music. Piero does a fabulous job singing. His accent is lost in the music, but he still manages to supply a slice of Italy. There is something warm and amorous in his technique.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2004 Year Book Volume 1 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Elsehow
This is a short intro that is similar to California Guitar Trio, but comes in a lunch-sized portion. Your hosts plan to leave your appetite fully intact for the evening supper.
Permanent Delight
The instrumentals in this song are like Mastermind while the vocals are folksier in nature. The strength of the song is the fact it takes several directions in a short period of time. The music takes a couple of abrupt tangents. Themes are cleverly reprised without getting overly repetitive or stagnant. This is a hearty salad with leafy greens and bits of bacon covered in a creamy dressing. It will fill you up early in the meal, so be sure to leave room for the remaining courses.
Illusions in the Magazine
The song opens with a passage that sounds like "Sirius" from the Alan Parsons Project. Imagine the player's introduction to the Chicago Bulls basketball team. It is another tasty tune. Think of it as a thick rich bowl of soup. This one has a salty broth, caramelized onions, and fat croutons all layered in chewy cheese. It's the most poetic of all the songs and it is simply delicious. Piero's guitar is vibrant at the end. The slurping of the remnants at the bottom of the bowl is the best part.
Ora Legale
This item is all for show as it arrives sizzling on a platter. It is a small hors d'oeuvre, but it lingers on the taste buds. It is mostly acoustic in nature. Giovanni Azzone provides guest percussions while Piero plays a sweet sounding guitar.
Nobody Care of Dusty Mellow
This is the longest piece on the album at eleven minutes and ten seconds, which makes it the main entrée. The song is a succulent slice of prime rib served with russet potatoes and scallions. If the earlier pieces didn't spoil your appetite, this one surely will. It should be no trouble cleaning your plate. The recipe used is again comparable to what is made in Mastermind's kitchen. Giovanni gives us more of his percussions after encouragement from some of the visiting patrons.
Nightingale
You're left bursting at the seams and need this time to digest. You're hunger has been thoroughly satisfied. The title track ruminates in your tummy. Annarita Amato plays a flavorsome flute. The end of this piece is the most jovial of all.
Oozing Twilight
Dessert is finally served. The crust is light and flakey. The frosting is sweet and succulent. This instrumental uses a dietary substitute for Mastermind that is equally tart and tangy.
Curved Air
There is a natural transition into this piece as the partygoers move into the living room. Cups of fresh roasted coffee are sipped during some informal chit-chat. The evening grows darker as the festivities wind down. A musician by the name of Dominica Ragone volunteers to play some bass for the guests. While this ballad is less adventurous than the other pieces, the melody is very good. It is a tightly wound tune and it is probably the best song on the album
Exit?
Before leaving the dinner party, you are tempted with some fine chocolate mints. A few small bites are all that's needed. With very little filler, this song is rich and makes your mouth water. This is the proper end to the album as it leaves your palette coated in delectable cocoa. Your belly is satisfied on the long ride home. Hidden at the end of the track is a reminder of the luscious meal.
 
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