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Non-Prog CD Reviews

Black Bone Child

Alligator

Review by Gary Hill

These guys lay down a smoking version of killer hard rock with plenty of retro stylings. Their sound at times makes you think of different bands like Led Zeppelin, Clutch and the Black Crowes. Nothing here is earth shattering or genre bending. It’s just killer classic rock tinged hard edged rock and roll. And there’s nothing wrong with that. This is a great disc that never gets tiresome or feels redundant.


This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2010  Volume 3 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Run Away

This pounds in with a healthy dosage of near metal meets classic rock. It’s got a great retro sound, but yet still feels modern. It is a little like something from Velvet Revolver.

Be Your Man
Another smoking retro rocker, this is a killer, too. It doesn’t vary a lot in terms of powerful rock and roll, but when it’s this tasty it doesn’t matter.
You Oughta Know
The riff that drives this track is exceptional. I can hear some Yardbirds on this along with the Black Crowes and even Clutch.
Baby Baby
Again, there are no molds being broken here, but this is just plain killer retro based hard rock. The instrumental section here is an extended one and has some great ‘70’s oriented guitar soloing. It leans a bit towards space rock.
Little Bird
There’s some killer blues slide guitar on this number. It sort of makes me think of a weird combination of Led Zeppelin, Brownsville Station, Blue Cheer, Clutch and others. It’s a great tune and not a drastic alteration, but still a bit of a change. It has some harmonica built into it. 
True Love Too Late
While this smoking retro rocker isn’t all that different from the rest of the music here, it still has its own unique musical identity. 
Turn It Up
There’s a little bit of a punk rock rawness here, but overall it’s another scorching retro rocker. We get quite a bit of harmonica on display, too. 
The Flames Are Warm
The harmonica is all over this one, too. It’s another stomper that’s tied to the bluesy end of retro hard rock. 
What I Know Ain't Right
There’s a bit of that punk rock vibe on this hard rocker, too. It’s another that’s strong and has its own identity without breaking any molds. There’s some especially tasty guitar work here.
This Disease
Vocals begin this one and the vibe that makes it up has more of a soulful texture. This cut really reminds me a lot of Grand Funk Railroad. It’s got a killer vocal arrangement.
Devil's Teeth
Another bluesy grind, this is arguably the strongest cut on show here. That makes it an excellent choice to close the disc. It really feels like what you might get if you mixed Led Zeppelin with Clutch and The Black Crowes.
 
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