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Progressive Rock CD Reviews

Carl Palmer

Working Live Volume 3

Review by Gary Hill

While Carl Palmer does a lot of music that was performed by Emerson Lake and Palmer, don’t expect his renditions to sound like that band. The motif on Palmer’s solo material is closer to a metallic fusion. Guitar is much more prominent and much crunchier. That said, there are definite ELP-like moments. All in all this live album is a strong release that just plain rocks.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2010  Volume 6 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Peter Gunn

There’s a symphonic bombastic opening section. Then the drums take over. From there they eventually make it out into the song proper. It’s a hard rocking, nearly metal, rendition in comparison to the original ELP version. The guitar dominates and has some serious crunchy sounds.

Romeo And Juliet
This cut is very much in a metal style. It’s hard edged, neo-classical and quite tasty.
Pictures At An Exhibition
This Emerson Lake and Palmer epic gets the Carl Palmer solo treatment. It’s the most dynamic piece on show here. At times it feels quite close to the original version. At other times it wanders much more into heavy metal territory. Other parts take on an almost fusion texture. All in all this is quite a cool thrill ride.
Bitches Crystal
A smoking hot rocker, this is closer to fusion. There is a mellower section that recurs at points, though.
Nutrocker
They put in a hard rocking, nearly metal rendition of the Christmas classic meets progressive rock classic.
In A Moroccan Market
This is an extended Carl Palmer drum solo.
 
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