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Progressive Rock CD Reviews

The Moody Blues

Every Good Boy Deserves Favour

Review by Gary Hill

This Moody Blues album is somewhat typical of the group, but in many ways seems less effective than some of the other releases in the group’s catalog. There is one real winner in the form of the radio favorite “The Story in Your Eyes.” All in all, though, this is a disc that falls into the category of “get this one after the rest.” In other words, it’s worth having, but the majority of the other Moodies albums are more compelling.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2010  Volume 6 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Procession

This has effects and some voices here and there. It serves as an introduction to the festivities, in keeping with the title. It’s a bit weird, but also cool. They pull it out to some Eastern music at one point and then work to more baroque stylings.

The Story In Your Eyes
A classic Moody Blues rocker, this has some soaring progressive rock sounds and styles. It’s tasty and cool.
Our Guessing Game
Based in a typical Moody Blues motif, this piece has both folk and progressive rock elements to it. It gets more involved and intense as it continues.
Emily's Song
This is bouncy and the horns seem to bring an almost jazz air. It’s mellow and perhaps a bit light in terms of tone.
After You Came
More along the lines of “The Story in Your Eyes,” this is the harder rocking side of the Moodies and it’s got some tasty melodic guitar soloing.
One More Time To Live
Beginning quite mellow and sedate, this track becomes much more powerful later. The vocal arrangement is particularly potent and noteworthy. They drop it back to the mellower stylings later and work it back up from there.
Nice To Be Here
Mellow and rather bouncy, this has a cool flavor and a tasty guitar solo, but doesn’t do a lot for this particular reviewer.
You Can Never Go Home
More of a lushly arranged balladic number, this is pretty and cool, but to my ears it tends towards a bit too precious at times.
My Song
This is very theatrical and a bit overdone, but it works out to some cool keyboards and other sounds and then it turns quite classical for a time. Eventually they take us back into a rock ballad sound that’s stronger than some of the other music. It seems a little disconnected at times, though.  
 
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