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Non-Prog CD Reviews

Deep Purple

Scandinavian Nights

Review by Larry Toering

Recorded live in Stockholm 1970, this Eagle re-issue is of a historic show that was bootlegged several times over before it was finally released in the late eighties. It has since been re-issued more than once since then on various labels, in both official and non official capacities. So it's nice to see it wind up on Eagle, a label worth stepping up and supporting. For decades this has been reknowned by fans as one of the very finest Purple concerts ever captured on tape, and that might be a matter of opinion, but it's one shared by thousands, if not more.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2011  Volume 5 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Speed King

After a grand opening salvo, off they go with some of the most energy every displayed (at least by that point in time) on stage by a rock band. Blackmore cuts through the arrangement like a knife with some out of this world, cosmic noodling. All are on fire and looking for a bucket of water to cool off by the time it's over - man alive!

Into The Fire

This is a track not heard live much before this recording was finally released in the late eighties, and it's a killer version with a tasty guitar solo to keep it interesting. It’s not my favorite number on In Rock, but it worked better live.

Paint It Black

At the time they were vastly becoming well known for this instrumental cover, I think by then they decided to drop it, as that's how they rolled. This features a long drum solo from Paice, and sometimes vocals were applied, sometimes not. Overall it wasn't the worst idea they ever had, just not the best, save for the drums of course.

Mandrake Root

This is one blistering version of this epic mkI track this line-up had no choice but to reinvent. Blackmore and Lord must be heard to be believed here, as they're at their career best as far as many are concerned. Gillan pulls off a screaming performance and Paice provides a beat like no other, along with the pounding bass of Glover.

Child In Time

Now this version is spectacular, with an organ solo to boot, it really defines this band in all of their glory. Gillan's screams are spot on, and Blackmore's soloing is made even more interesting because of said organ solo, taking them on sort of a duel that this track didn't always get in concert. Of course this is last but not least material, as it is one of Purple’s finest tracks ever recorded.

 

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