Artists | Issues | CD Reviews | Interviews | Concert Reviews | DVD/Video Reviews | Book Reviews | Who We Are | Staff | Home
 
Non-Prog CD Reviews

Milo Greene

1957

Review by Larry Toering

This is a two track record from a great folk band called “Milo Greene.” What their name means I have no idea, but they're an interesting band with a lot of creative energy and a surrealistic vibe. It comes in a white vinyl picture sleeve 45rpm single, and a download file for .mp3 users and .flac option as well for what they advertise as “nerds” -because apparently only nerds deserve to hear their money's worth, or perhaps that is a consumer joke I don't get or something. It wouldn't be the first time. I do like this band and the two tracks on offer are great stuff, especially for evenings. (Editor's Note: This technically is not a CD since the only formats in which it's available are digital and vinyl.)

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2012  Volume 2 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
1957
This is a lovely tune with a unique approach to everything, especially the percussion. There is a sing along part toward the end that repeats heavily as it takes the tune out and ends abruptly for a perfect touch. The groove is soft and moody but positive and uplifting as well, and the whole arrangement is superbly delivered with a pure and crisp sound. It's especially noticeable on the vinyl to adjusted ears, so the best option recommended for the download in order to hear such warmth, would be the .flac file.
Silent Way
Side two is a little bit shorter track, and much different from side one. It's full of bright melodies and a melancholy vocal performance. This is a very sublime piece with a sort of fluffy lyrical charm. It has a surreal vibe to it that is very contagious, as is the subtle string work within. “When we're older / Can I still come over” is repeated throughout, until it becomes “when when when we're older” and fades away. This is just a lovely tune to back “1957,” as it does so well.
 
More CD Reviews
Metal/Prog Metal
Non-Prog
Progressive Rock

Ultimate Indie Bundle Banner
 
Google

   Creative Commons License
   This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.

    © 2019 Music Street Journal                                                                           Site design and programming by Studio Fyra, Inc./Beetcafe.com