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Progressive Rock CD Reviews

Vibravoid

Gravity Zero

Review by Gary Hill

We get quite a cool mix of sounds on this set. There is some Hawkwind here at times. At other points we get psychedelia. They even cover a psychedelic classic. Pink Floyd, as kind of a common ground between space rock and psychedelic, also shows up as a reference. The whole mix of sounds really works well, and I like this disc a lot. It’s a lot of fun.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2012  Volume 4 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Gravitation Zero

There’s an extended introduction here that’s made up of weird sounds that sometimes clash. It works out from there into a killer jam that’s got a lot of both psychedelic music and space rock in it. This isn’t going to be mistaken for Hawkwind by any means, but it does share a lot of territory with that legendary band. There’s definitely some Hawk-like guitar soloing going on later in the piece and this is a real killer. It’s quite an extensive number and has some sections of echoed voice weirdness.

No Silver Bird

Hawk-like space is all over this from the vocals to the keyboard sounds that swirl over the top. Of course, early Pink Floyd is also a valid reference. Whatever you call it, though, this is a cool tune that really works nicely.

Photosynthesis in Darkness

There’s a lot of Robert Calvert-like sound here. In fact, this really feels like the Calvert era of Hawkwind or perhaps his solo work. There is some great fuzz bass on this beast and it’s one of the most successful pieces on the disc.

Travelling Without Moving

Here we get a short bit of instrumental weirdness.

Eruptions Of The Green Sun

This cut feels like it could have been released in the 1960s. It’s got that trippy kind of psychedelic rock sound. It’s a good tune and a nice change of pace.

Shotgun Wedding

There’s a lot of great guitar soloing on this instrumental. It’s certainly got that Hawkwind turned more psychedelic motif in play.

Get Out Of Here

Here we have another cut that feels a lot like Hawkwind. In fact, I’d say that it’s got a lot in common with “Silver Machine” in terms of its echoey space rock goodness.

The White Ship

This is a cover of the classic psychedelic tune from the band H. P. Lovecraft, based on the song by the author of the same name. This is a noisy and echoey take on the piece. I really like it a lot. It’s a lot different than the original, but it’s also tasty and the sound befits the source material nicely.

Brainplane

Echoey psychedelic goodness makes up the first parts of this cut, working through what could be considered a full song. Then it shifts and twists turning to atmospheric sounds and white noise with swirling space keys and spoken words sort of fading to the backdrop. This feels suitably chemically enhanced. It comes back to the song proper after a while, though. 

La Vie En Dusseldorf
There’s almost a dance groove to this electronic psychedelic trip. It’s got plenty of space rock in it, too.
Radiation Zero

Here we have some suitably weird sound effects driven psychedelia. That motif holds it for quite a while. Then it grows out into something very much like early Pink Floyd, perhaps blended with some Hawkwind. This is spacey and quite cool as it drives forward. It does tend to drag on a bit, but it’s a heck of a tune, anyway.  

 
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