Artists | Issues | CD Reviews | Interviews | Concert Reviews | DVD/Video Reviews | Book Reviews | Who We Are | Staff | Home
 
Progressive Rock CD Reviews

Bike Thief

Stuck in a Dream

Review by Gary Hill

Shoegaze, psychedelic rock, space rock and prog all seem to merge on this beast. It’s modern sounding, but there are a lot of nods to older music. It’s a powerful album that works really well. There is a lot of variety and range here, but it’s always effective.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2014  Volume 6 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
A Breath

This instrumental introduction is just a little over half a minute long. It’s got an atmospheric, almost symphonic beauty to it.

Ghosts of Providence
This powers in with a modern progressive rock vibe. It’s like the kind of trend Radiohead started. The arrangement is lush and powerful. It never wanders into real shoegaze territory, but it has hints of it.
Kiss the Light
I love the bouncy rock vibe of this. Sure, it’s still got plenty of that modern progressive rock sound built into it. The arrangement is lush, and this has a lot of psychedelia in it, too. The instrumental break takes it into jazzy space rock. It’s really quite magical. The closing section is a bit of bass driven style.
We Once Knew Ya
World music, progressive rock and psychedelia all merge on this piece. It’s got a great stuttering approach. In a lot of ways it’s the most traditional progressive rock based thing we’ve heard here. Still, it has plenty of that more modern sound in place. It’s rather moody, but also very cool. It’s one of the highlights really. There’s a false ending that gives way to real powerhouse prog section.
Somewhere New
Jam band sounds, psychedelia and alternative rock all blend with the modern prog stylings we’ve gotten used to on this disc. This isn’t a huge change, and the more powered up sections are the most proggy, but it’s very effective and powerful.
The Burning Past
I really love the bass line on this thing. The song is pretty typical, but the powered up jam mid-track is a fuzz-laden prog bit of magic. This is actually quite a strong number. It’s one of my favorite here.
Violet Waves
This is much more of a straightforward rocker. It’s not really very proggy, but I love the horns and the strings on the piece. It’s a cool tune. The instrumental section does bring more progressive rock to the table, though.
Tide of Reason
Although this piece is mellower, it’s a real powerhouse. It’s full of lush sounds, emotion and much more. Its arrangement is complex, and it’s just a very compelling song. It’s one of my favorites here.
Shimmer
The rhythm section starts this number. Although there are some non-lyrical vocals, this is really an instrumental. It’s a prog rock scorcher, too. It’s one of the best of the disc.
Stuck in a Dream
At over ten minutes in length, they saved the epic for last. It’s epic in terms of scope, too. It starts off tentatively with atmospheric weirdness. Piano joins, and the cut builds in a rather unsettling way. Eventually that gives way to more of a full song treatment and it continues to evolve. After the two minute mark some Klesmer styled sounds emerge and build in intensity and pace. By about a minute later it fires out into some screaming hard rock. Before the six minute mark that resolves and it drops way down to mellower motifs. We’re brought back into a mellow song proper from there. It works out from there in moody, spacey sort of modern progressive rock ways. The piece just continues to shift and evolve as it continues forward, though. This becomes sort of a jazzy space rock jam for a while. Then around the nine minute mark it drops way down to atmospherics. That mode takes the album to its close.
 
More CD Reviews
Metal/Prog Metal
Non-Prog
Progressive Rock
 
Google

   Creative Commons License
   This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.

    © 2019 Music Street Journal                                                                           Site design and programming by Studio Fyra, Inc./Beetcafe.com