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Progressive Rock CD Reviews

Remain in Silence

..and the soul goes on

Review by Gary Hill

Maybe these guys aren’t really progressive rock. Their music is clearly progressive, though. I’d say that both the title track and the final piece on the album clearly qualify as prog rock. The rest nearly all has elements related to things like Porcupine Tree and RPWL. For that reason, I land this under prog. The moody textures and whole package, though, land this in the neighborhood of extremely strong.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2016  Volume 3 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Rain

Built with a lot of 80s music in it, this is a cool electronic styled piece of music. I love the percussive elements, and the vocal delivery is great, too. I dig the little Americana guitar based break later, too. Sure, this might not be obvious prog, but it’s clearly similar to things by bands like Porcupine Tree and RPWL.

Fragment #1
This short piece has atmospheric music and spoken words. It reminds me in some ways of Fish era Marillion.
All Forgotten Times
I dig the rhythmic elements here. This has a great dark electronic vibe. As the arrangement fills out, the magic increases. I love the hard edged, but still understated guitar.
Every Little Thing
There is definitely a lot of Americana built into this beast, too. This is probably more like 80s music more than it is like anything else.
Fragment #2
Here we get another bit of ambience with spoken words.
The Hunters
Although this also has a lot of that 80s sound, there is a real symphonic element at play at times, too. Some of the other layers of sound, along with that aspect, bring it more in the prog venue. I love some of the crunchy guitar on this.
Hope & Fear (Revisited)
This is so energetic and powerful in terms of the evocative vibes. I love the keyboard textures over the top. I am also in love with the bass line. This is a perfect pairing of that 80s vibe with modern prog type sounds.
A Distant View
The symphonic, atmospheric elements that start this are pure prog and very cool. Then it works to a dark sort of jam that’s part prog metal ballad and part progressive rock. This is such a beautiful and powerful piece of music. It’s the most definitely prog thing here, too. Mind you, it’s modern prog, not the old school stuff.
Fragment #3
The music on this is more developed than on some of the other “fragments” It’s more like soundtrack music. The vocals are partly sung, too.
Wrapped In Ice
Here’s another with a great bass line. This is energized and quite cool. It’s not a big change, but just a very effective piece of music.
Higher Heaven
Built on a cool electronic musical concept, this is pretty and nicely moody. It turns heavier and more rocking later in the piece.
The Soul Goes On
Sound effects serve as the backdrop for a spoken voice stating the title. Other sounds are heard in an effects laden arrangement and then the voice repeats itself. Moody music emerges quite atmospheric after that. The line is repeated and the music moves up slightly. This never really rises up to the territory of a real “song.” It’s quite artsy and cool.
This Silent Sea
Piano serves as the only background for the vocals at the start of this. The cut evolves with that same musical concept firmly in place. In fact, that remains the idea behind the whole song. It’s a nice ballad.
Endless Sea
Coming in dark and dramatic, the opening segment here make it very clear that this will be a special piece of music. As it builds and intensifies, that is made even more apparent. This instrumental is one of the most potent musical journey of the whole set. It’s a great closing piece.
 
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