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Progressive Rock CD Reviews

├śresund Space Collective

Ode to a Black Hole

Review by Gary Hill

Any album from OSC is an interesting ride. This time around, it really feels like a journey through space. When you talk about “space rock,” this is really what should come to mind. This instrumental excursion starts and ends dramatically, but the material in between never fails, either. In some ways this is the most “space” oriented disc from these guys. It’s two connected pieces that are parts of the same whole. All together this is a little less than an hour long. It’s also very consistently strong.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2016  Volume 3 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Ode to a Black Hole Part 1

This first outing is just about 26 minutes in length. Spacey effects start this. Then a bass sound is heard that feels kind of like a weird radar ping or perhaps a pulsar. Wind sounds swirl around as they create this awesome spacescape. It’s understated and mellow, but also extremely intriguing and effective. As with a lot of space rock, nothing changes fast here. However, this piece really does evolve, eventually moving into more rocking territory. This is an incredibly effective space rock jam. It never feels redundant or tired. This eventually transitions into part two in the midst of a mellower section.

Ode to a Black Hole Part 2
The tides of space time begin to pull this upward and forward after it comes out of the previous section. This half is just a little longer than the previous segment was. There are some pretty trippy sections to this part of the piece. That’s pretty true of the whole thing in a lot of ways, but even more so here. It gets into some rather noisy territory around the half way mark. Around the seventeen minute mark it shifts towards stoner metal and a heavy, plodding sound takes control. There are sections that definitely nod to Black Sabbath, perhaps landing along the lines of Sleep or even Electric Wizard. It gets pretty weird at times as it carries on, but it ends very abruptly.
 
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