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Non-Prog CD Reviews

Eliot Bronson

James

Review by Gary Hill

There seems to be a big movement towards roots music and folk based sounds these days. This album fits in that category. It ranges from old blues music to things like Dylan all the way up to music that calls to mind Tom Petty. This is a diverse and dynamic album that always manages to work well.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2018  Volume 1 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Breakdown In G Major
Blues and folk music blend on this. In some ways it feels like some of the acoustic blues stuff Led Zeppelin used to do. The vocals are closer to the Bob Dylan end of the spectrum, though. I suppose this feels like what you might have gotten if Bob Dylan and Robert Johnson worked together. This is classy stuff. The harmonica adds something special here.
Good Enough
Speaking of Bob Dylan, this feels a lot like it could have been done by him. The arrangement is fairly lush. This is a folk tune at its core. It gets some bits of Americana guitar in the mix at times.
The Mountain
This is set in a dramatic Americana style. It's moody and quite classy.
Stranger
More along the lines of an intricate folk sound, this has plenty of that Americana built into it, too. It has some parts that seem to stretch toward a dream pop kind of direction.
Rough Ride
More of a rocker, this is packed full of Americana. It's one of my favorite cuts of the disc. It just seems to work really well. The lyrics to this are a brutal indictment of modern American society.
Hard Times
This is a pretty folk based number. It's a classy cut.
Rollin Down A Line
This makes me think of Tom Petty to a large degree. This is an energetic and bouncy kind of piece. It's one of the highlights of the disc.
Mercy
Another mellower, folk based cut, this is a nice number. There are some hints of that dream pop kind of Americana here. Personally, I think the previous song might have made a stronger closer, but this works reasonably well in that slot.
 
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