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Non-Prog CD Reviews

Lucinda Belle

Think Big, Like Me

Review by Gary Hill

Parts of this disc are likely to convince you that this is an old album. That's because so much of the music here is set in the jazz of the 20s and 30s. There are some modern elements at times, but the retro stylings are ever-present. This is quite an effective set and a nice counter-point to a lot of the over-produced pop music of the present. It really does call to mind an earlier era. It should be noted that I previously reviewed the opening track as a digital single. For the sake of consistency, I've used that track review here.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2019  Volume 4 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Baby Don't Cry
I love the jazzy groove of the cut. It's mellow and so tasteful on the opening section. The vocals bring a lot of magic and even more emotion. The second movement of this gets a lot of jazz energy and vibe. Some backing vocals bring a retro swing element. The track drops way back down to its mellowest movements for a verse after that, but it fires back upward for the chorus. This is a real slab of goodness that is well set in a bygone era. Yet, it still manages to be relevant today.
Where Have All The Good Men Gone
There is a reggae vibe to this number. It has plenty of retro textures and jazzy sounds, too. It's another classy groove that works really well. There is a real modern pop energy and vibe here, too.
I Believe
There is a sound like a worn record at the beginning of this tune. After the introduction that is gone. The song proper is sort of a jazz meets old-school rock and roll and modern pop sort of dittie. The backing vocals, and really the whole arrangement, lends a real retro texture. The horns add a lot to the later parts of the tune.
New Boy
This is such a cool tune. It's slow moving, decidedly retro styled and fairly minimalist. The vocals really shine here, delivering a lot of emotion and style.
Do Me Right
The jazz here is powered up and swinging. The tune has a good balance between mellower and more powered up stuff. It all oozes cool, though. I really love the horns on this thing. There is a male rap later in the song. It manages to bring a modern edge to cut. The harp is a nice touch, too.
My Only Lament
A mellower, slower, tune, this is perhaps even more retro in texture. It does get more musical intensity as it works forward. The vocals are the real shining star here, though.
Time Won't Wait
This is such a pretty and classy mellow jazz number. It really feels like it would have been at home in the 1920s or 30s.
Nothing Left To Do But Smile
The "f bomb" that earns this cut its parental advisory is the anachronistic element of the song. Beyond that it's another shuffling jazz number that feels like a journey to the 1930s.
The Other Side Of You
Energized and catchy, this has more of that old school jazz thing, but also some serious old-time rock and roll. This is a cool tune on a disc that's full of cool music. 
Washed Up On Love
This is a particularly tasty slab of retro jazz goodness.
Do Your Time
There is a real Dixieland kind of groove to this thing. The duet with a male vocalist lends another dimension to the cut. This is a great bit of music and one of the highlights of the disc.
Don't Go Chasing Your Heart
The harp opens this number in a mellow and rather delicate way. The vocals bring magic over the top of the arrangement as this continues. While this gets some strings and piano, it's built on one of the more stripped back structures here. It's also one of the prettiest songs.
 
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