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Troposphere

Troposphere

Review by Gary Hill

This project is the new thing from Greg Lounsberry. He's a busy guy who has been the main man behind projects from Laserdogs to October Tree and more. He also hosts a prog rock radio show. This album isn't a big surprise. It's the kind of melodic AOR prog I generally expect from any of Lounsberry's project. It's a solid release that definitely lives up to its potential.

 

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2017  Volume 4 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Time Slip

They bring this in with a bit of jazz turned prog movement. The cut has a definite AOR element at play. I particularly like some of the instrumental work on this number.

Modern Town

A bit slower, this cut seems to merge a sort of 80s electronic prog vibe with a progressive rock element. There are some harder rocking sections built into this. This one is also rather AOR oriented, but perhaps leans a bit more toward a pure progressive sound.

Four Fingers

In a lot of ways this is one of the most accessible cuts here. Still, there is plenty of meaty on the bones of this beast. The vocal hooks on this are among the catchiest of the whole disc. The extended instrumental section later in the track makes me think of Pink Floyd just a bit.

One Track Mind

This instrumental is built on melodic prog. It's a fairly straight-line journey, but it's scenic.

The World That Lies Beyond The Dream

Another with hints of 80s pop music, this has some jazz and plenty of AOR prog in the mix, too.

The Jeweled Eye

There is no big change here. Instead what we have is another melodic prog cut that works quite well.

Atmosphere

Another instrumental, this is classy stuff. I love the guitar soloing on the tune.

Stranger World

I dig the sort of trippy element that is at play in parts of this. The melodic guitar soloing later is classy. There is a definite dreamy sound to this cut.

Troposphere
The title track is rocking instrumental that has a lot of old school prog in the mix. Horns bring some jazz to the table. This is one of the coolest pieces here, so it makes sense that it's the title track. It drops back to just the rhythm section for the closing movement. The drums get pretty involved as it moves forward.
Lighter Than Air

Coming in fairly mellow, there are some intriguing bits of instrumental work laced into the arrangement here. I can make out some old world music at times on this. When the vocals join the cut feels closer to 1960s psychedelic rock. This shifts out to an almost Beatles-like instrumental section later in the track to move it forward. That movement works through some changes before taking us back to the song proper to finish it all.

 
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