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Lunden Reign

Confessions (vinyl)

Review by Gary Hill

When I reviewed an earlier album from this act I landed them under heavy metal. I remember that they were billed as progressive rock, but honestly, I don't think that tag fit. Well, perhaps it fits a little more here, and this time around it's a bit less metal, but honestly, this is closer to things like The Runaways and Kim Wilde than to progressive rock or real steel. Still, there is enough metal here, and in keeping with the last one, that's where I'm landing it. This is melodic rocking stuff that has a good amount of variety from song to song. It manages to get into some seriously crunchy territory. This edition is printed on some heavy blue (almost turquoise) vinyl. If you dig catchy melodic rock with some definite metal in the mix, give this a try. I highly recommend the vinyl edition if you have a turntable.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2018  Volume 3 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Side A
             
Stardust Daze

The pop rock sounds on this are classy. The verses are more in line with standard rock, but the choruses get an almost metal approach. This is a catchy cut that works quite well.

Confessions
The title track powers in with more of an epic metal vibe. There are parts of this that land toward the more melodic metal sounds. This is an energized and powerful rocker with some cool hooks. This powerhouse number is just so cool. The soaring vocals on the piece and the dramatic arrangement both work so well.
Coming Home Tonight
Another mainstream rock meets heavy metal vibe makes up the musical concept of this. It's another winner, too. There is a nice balance between dropped back and powered up music here.
Red Wagon
I love the driving riff driven basis for this cut. It's another cool rocker. I'd consider it to be partly almost punk based alternative rock, but there is still plenty of metal here. This has some great hooks, and is another highlight of the set.
Little Lost Girl
This is more of a mainstream, hook laden pop rocker. It feels a lot like some of the melodic rock that came out in the 1970s.
Side B
        
Fate of the World

The introduction here has a great AOR crunchy prog sound to it. The tune modulates out to more of an epic metal kind of vibe as it works out to the vocal section. This makes me think of a more modern, pop oriented version of Warlock in some ways. It's a killer tune that's another highlight of the set.

Never Ending Dream

More AOR styled stuff, this perhaps has some hints of progressive rock in the mix. Overall, it's less metal and more just melodic pop rock.

Dead Man Walking
Now, this is metal. It has a meaty, riff driven sound. This almost makes me think of a metal version of the harder rocking end of Heart's sound. This is classy stuff that's among the best music here.
Thunder or the Rain
We're back into more AOR territory with this one. It has some dropped back stuff balanced with more rocking music. In a way this is along the lines of a power ballad approach in that it keeps building. There are some particularly soaring things at play here.        
Faded Memories
The opening stomping section on this almost makes me think of the metal side of Alice Cooper. It drops to a more melodic rock movement for the entrance of the vocals. Still, there is a metal edge to it. This is another powerhouse and another highlight of the disc. It makes great use of both hooks and some crunchy guitar riffs. There are some moments that call to mind Rick Nielsen's guitar sound just a bit, too. Mind you, I'm talking the more metallic of his output. This really closes things in style.
 
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