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Harmless Habit

Fronterror

Review by Gary Hill

This is the second EP from this act. That means they are relatively new. As such, they show a lot of promise. Their music is catchy and often meaty. The main issue I have with it is that it's not all that unique or distinctive. Instead, they sound a lot like any number of modern alternative hard rocking bands. The thing is, that's sort of par for the course with newer acts. A lot of early releases from bands that become quite unique and original seem to be almost derivative. It takes experience and time to develop an original sound.  These guys seem to have the talent to pull it off, and they are creating some solid music in the meantime.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2018  Volume 6 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Fronterror
Guitar brings this into being. Some processed vocals come over the top. The cut works forward with a cool riff-driven jam that's part alternative rock, part nu-metal and part modern pop rock. It's a cool cut that has plenty of meat on the bones along with some solid hooks.
Freakshow
Fast paced and aggressive, this is a fierce modern metal styled rocker. It's not all that unique in style, but it sure works well. There is a bit of a punky edge to it in a lot of ways.
Damage Control
With a little studio chatter at the start, this thing powers up to more of a pure rock and roller. There are still both modern alternative rock and punk edges to this, though. The cut has the most timeless sound of anything here, though. This is quite hard-edged and might be my favorite tune of the set.
My Distraction
We're more into the whole pop alternative rock vein with this one. It's incredibly catchy, but perhaps not all that distinctive.
Tight!
I dig the punky edge to this stomper. It's a killer cut that works well. It's another highlight of the set.
Not Afraid to Die
This opens with a rather precious balladic approach. It's not a bad section, but feels a bit generic and over-done. The cut fires out after a time to something that closer to an emo sound. Again, it's not the most unique thing you'll hear, but it works quite well. It rocks with a good energy and some solid hooks. It gets quite powerful and almost metallic later in the piece. While I'm not crazy about the way this thing starts, once it fires out into the seriously rocking stuff, it becomes a highlight of the disc.

 

 
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