Artists | Issues | CD Reviews | Interviews | Concert Reviews | DVD/Video Reviews | Book Reviews | Who We Are | Staff | Home
 

Clint Bahr

Puzzlebox

Review by Gary Hill

Clint Bahr has been covered at Music Street Journal previously as part of the group Tripod. This is his new solo album. I think this might be one of the most creative and interesting things I've heard in a while. It bends so many genres, and yet it feels cohesive. There are jazz things, freeform stuff, hard rock, psychedelia, King Crimson like music and lots more. Some of this is more accessible and mainstream than other things, but it's all compelling. This includes the late, great Peter Banks Colin Carter and Mike Hough, who were band-mates of Banks in his post Yes band Flash show up on the album, too. So does violinist/viola player David Cross of King Crimson fame. There are plenty of other guests here, but those are the names that really caught my eye. If you like a real sense of adventure and experimentation in your music, you really need to check this out. I think you will love it.

This review is available in book (paperback and hardcover) form in Music Street Journal: 2022  Volume 4. More information and purchase links can be found at: garyhillauthor.com/Music-Street-Journal-2022.

Track by Track Review
Tabula Rasa
Psychedelic world music elements start this track, and it builds outward in that vein. This is a classy instrumental piece.
New Design
World music concepts start this. The track drives out with a bombastic movement from there that makes me think of King Crimson. As it gets to the vocal part of the tune, it gets a little more mainstream rock, but it's still proggy. The number has such a cool combination of sounds with an almost surf-rock riff in place at times, but all delivered with a psychedelia meets Crimson intensity.
Plate
Weird jazz, strange Crimsonian wanderings and more are on display on this freaky, but so cool, piece. This instrumental is freeform, avante garde and so cool.
Shelter

Coming in super-heavy and rocking, this is another that has plenty of King Crimson in the mix. It works to a Cream meets psychedelia vibe for the first vocals. The number works onward by alternating between those things. There is an old-fashioned music section for a short time a couple times on the tune, too. A noisy instrumental break later is on fire. The mix of sounds here is unusual, and yet it works so well. This is actually one of my favorite tunes here.

As Tympani Melt In The Greek Heat
Weird experimental music much like early King Crimson brings this in and holds it in a freeform way. This extensive (nearly 11 minutes) instrumental is insane, but also incredibly cool.
Fall From Grace
Metallic and yet prog-based, this is suitably weird and incredibly cool. There is some definite King Crimson in the mix and much more. It is psychedelic and has a rather Alice Cooper like descent into mellower madness mid-track.
Belt & Braces
This short instrumental is a jazz jam that has some really crazed elements.
Triangles Circles And Squares
Coming in tentatively, this turns rather symphonic as first thing beyond that. Then it gets into some rather Crimson-like hard-edged weirdness to continue. This instrumental is another that's fairly short.  
Oslo
Weird sound effects and freakiness serve as the backdrop for a female spoken vocal. This makes me think of Curved Air to some degree. It's another short piece.
Kicking The Wasps Nests
Driving and furious prog rock jamming ensues as this thing gets underway.
Lifeguard In The Rain
Weird atmospherics and effects brings this into being. The cut works out to some balladic approaches to continue. This gets psychedelic and trippy later.
Tabula Rasa 2
This closing instrumental piece is, as you probably guessed, related to the opening number of the set. It serves as a nice bookend.

 

 
Return
 
Google

   Creative Commons License
   This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.

    © 2022 Music Street Journal                                                                           Site design and programming by Studio Fyra, Inc./Beetcafe.com